For the fourth successive year, the Australian Psychological Society (APS) commissioned a Stress and Wellbeing Survey of the Australian adult population.

The key findings found for Australian women are:

  • Wellbeing: Women reported significantly lower levels of wellbeing than men.
  • Stress: Women reported higher levels of stress than men.
  • Top stress factors: Money (53%), Family (52%) and Personal Health (45%) are the top stressors for women.
  • Depression and Distress: Women share a similar level of depression and distress to men.
  • Anxiety: Women reported significantly lower levels of anxiety than men.
  • Stress and physical health: More women (21%) than men (13%) said that stress was strongly impacting their physical health.
  • Stress and mental health: More women (23%) than men (14%) said that stress was strongly impacting their mental health.
  • De-stressing: Compared to men, women were more likely to relax by spending time with friends or family, reading, shopping, visiting social networking websites or avoiding stressful people or situations.
  • Staying healthy: More women (89%) than men (84%) said they had tried to stay healthy in the last 12 months.
  • Why women stay healthy: Women said they stay healthy to Make them more attractive (75%, compared to 66% of men), Reduce stress (91%, compared to 88% of men) and Because It’s the right thing to do (98%, compared to 95% of men).
  • Health as a priority: More women (82o/o) than men (76%) believe that staying healthy Is Important.
  • Barriers to staying healthy: The key things preventing women from staying healthy were Unexpected life events getting In the way (67%), Loss of motivation (65%), Family demands {54%) and Expense (63%).
  • Alcohol: Women (72%) were more likely than men (63%) to Limit or eliminate alcohol to stay healthy.
  • Positive change: Women (70%) were more likely than men (64%) to Have a specific plan for changing my lifestyle and had a stronger desire to change (85%, compared to 80% of men).

For more information please go to APS website. 

© 2015 The Australian Psychological Society

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